Exciting News!

Its a wrap!
Its a wrap!

I’ve been leaking hints for the last few weeks, but it is official: Machine Knitting Special Techniques: Color and Texture will be released by the end of May on Craftsy.com.

This is my second class for Craftsy and I have to say that I have loved working with them. The preparation that goes into a Craftsy class is amazing – with highly qualified people assigned to every step along the way. I feel very fortunate to have these opportunities come my way!

How is THIS for close-up detail?!
How is THIS for close-up detail?!

This class is divided into three sections. First, we take a look at the garter bar. To say that the close ups are amazing is an understatement! I think you will agree, once you see it, that it brings each step clearly into focus and makes the process of turning work over (for one) a whole lot more understandable.

Peruvian Dancer Intarsia Sweater pattern (in four sizes) is included in the lass materials.
Peruvian Dancer Intarsia Sweater pattern (in four sizes) is included in the lass materials.

The next section focuses on intarsia knitting and the last section on entrelac knitting. The projects included in the class materials include a cap with a shaped crown, an intarsia sweater with an unusual edging and an intarsia tunic.

I chose the Peruvian dancer motif for the intarsia sweater because I have always loved Peruvian textiles. In fact, the charts I included for practice pieces are also Peruvian inspired – a cat and a jaguar – that you could use on any garment.

I worked the intarsia designs with Lion Brand Superwash Merino, which is a DK weight that knits beautifully on mid-gauge and chunky machines. For the entrelac tunic, I used Lion Fisherman wool. All of my samples were worked on the LK150, but these are methods suitable for all machines. Garter bar, intarsia and entrelac are all methods that do not rely on fancy machines and are worked the same on all brands and gauges.

The class is due to launch at the end of May – I’ll let you know when I have an exact date. I plan to give away FIVE FREE CLASSES to subscribers of this blog so if you have been linking over from Facebook or Twitter, make sure you are subscribed to the blog itself so your name is included in the drawing.

The Farmyard series features wrap-around motifs. I love the ducks!
The Farmyard series features wrap-around motifs. I love the ducks!

Free Intarsia Patterns for Children!!! Because I have had intarsia on my mind a lot lately, I contacted Vogue Knitting and was able to get permission to offer the children’s patterns I did for Family Circle Easy Knitting Magazine as free downloads on my web site. Just go to the “Free Stuff” page and look for Farmyard or Reptile Sweaters. You should blow up the charts when you print them out – magazines always try to save space and these were long patterns with lots of visuals. The charts are small.

 

The beginner class met in mid-april - a great group that hit it off right away - with each other and with me!
The beginner class met in mid-april – a great group that hit it off right away – with each other and with me!

Still time to enroll in a class here in Connecticut! 

The two classes I offered here in Connecticut are over or full, but the local Recreation Department, which is sponsoring the classes, has added another 2-day class on Saturday/Sunday, May 21 & 22. The cost is $150 and includes lunch both days – and dinner at my house on Saturday night. To register, contact the North Branford Rec Dept at 203-484-6017.

Happy Mother’s Day and Happy Spring!

 

 

 

 

 

Judith Duffy’s Cabled Edging

Talk about something I wish I had invented, but didn’t! I LOVE this edging/Bind Off/trim and have used it for all kinds of things over the years. With Judith Duffy’s kind permission, it appeared in Hand-Manipulated Stitches for Machine Knitters (page 183) and there was even a hand-knit version of it in Knitters’ Magazine to accompany the machine knit pattern I did for the gold sweater that appeared in the blog post of March 7, 2016 – and again here (below).

I first saw this edging when I was a contributing editor for Threads Magazine (in the earliest years of the magazine) and they were doing a feature article on fiber artist Judith Duffy’s work. They asked me to choose one of her textures to reproduce for the article and I spent some time figuring out machine knit directions for the cabled edging. Do you remember the wolf-in-sheep’s-clothing garment that graced a back cover in those early years? It was a stunning piece by Duffy and unlike anything I have seen before or since, hand or machine knitted.

Notice the Duffy Edging on the ribs - great way to bind off ribbing for a change!
Notice the Duffy Edging on the ribs – great way to bind off ribbing for a change!

The gold sweater at left is a twisted stitch and latched up tuck stitch pattern (see previous blog 3/7/16), but take a close look at the edge of the ribbing. I started all the garment pieces on waste yarn and went back later to work the ribs. Instead of a conventional rib bind off, I worked the Duffy Cabled Edging to trim and bind off the ribs all at once.

 

 

 

Check out the pretty neckline with JDCE finish!
Check out the pretty neckline with JDCE finish!

Most of all, I think I have used it to bind off neckline stitches when shaping a neckline with short rows, preserving live stitches. On a standard gauge machine it produces a lovely, delicate neckline finish.

You can also use this edging to join two garment or afghan sections together by rehanging them on the machine with the wrong sides facing each other and then working the edging. As with the I-cord join (blog 4/8/16), make sure you always hang the pieces the same way as there is a right and wrong side to the way the edging joins the base fabric.

This Cabled Edging can be worked on live stitches or selvage edges, which makes it perfect for finishing afghans!
This Cabled Edging can be worked on live stitches or selvage edges, which makes it perfect for finishing afghans!

The method is quite simple. Hang the work on the machine with the right side (whatever that is) facing you – live stitches or selvage edges (whole stitches are best). All of the needles except the first 3 on the carriage side are in holding position and the carriage must be set to hold needles in HP. Knit 12 rows over the 3 working needles and then remove those stitches on a 3-prong tool and pass the tool under the adjacent 3 needles and re-hang the stitches on the 4th, 5th and 6th needles from the edge.Place the empty needles in NWP. Repeat till you either reach a corner or the end. If you want to turn a corner, add two more rows to the last two groups on each side to help make the corner so that it doesn’t flatten out. You’ll also find that you can’t easily hang the next side of an afghan until you get right to the corner. At that point, you might want to remove those last few stitches and re-hang them on the far right end of the bed to give you lots of needles to re-hang the next side.

I almost always work with 3 stitches and knit 12 rows for each spiral, but you can certainly work with more stitches if you have a tool to handle them. Twelve rows almost always works out right, but you might find that 10 or 14 are better so work the edging on your gauge swatch to find out before you begin. You might also find that you want to adjust your stitch size a bit smaller or larger – sampling always pays off.

As I said in the tutorial, the float that passes underneath the first 3 needles always gets hidden inside the spiral, but you can certainly opt to knit those needles back and eliminate the float if – for some unforeseen reason – it shows. Also, by way of variation, I have seen students work this trim in two colors, which is very cool. In that case, it might be best to knit back the float of at least one of the colors.

When you reach the end, you want the trim to end quickly and neatly. What I have always done is to knit half as many rows on the second to last group and then immediately reduce those 3 stitches to a single stitch. Move that single stitch to the last needle at left, knit 1 row over the last 3 needles and then reduce those stitches to a single stitch and pull the yarn tail through to secure.

I think there are all kinds of creative possibilities for this edging – I love the cabled effect and the fact that it also binds off stitches. Lately I have been playing with a cabled cord effect by e-wrapping, knitting 1 row over all needles and then working the JDCE. I think it still needs a little work and then I will share it with you! What other ways can you think to use this trim?

I-Cord Bind Off

I really think that ribbing is often over-used and not always appropriate for the garment in question. I understand that once people invest in a ribber, they want to make use of it, but ribbers are capable of much more interesting things than just bands at hip and cuff. And, surely there are edgings and bands more suitable to delicate lace knitting than an inch and a half of 1 x 1 ribbing. For me, the answer is often the I-Cord Bind Off.

This is a fabulous edging that can be worked on any machine (even simple ones like the LK-150) and it produces a beautiful, hand-crafted edge every time.

This is the edging I was working on in the tutorial. Isn't it a b beautiful way to finish all the edges?
This is the edging I was working on in the tutorial. Isn’t it a beautiful way to finish all the edges?

You are probably familiar with I-cord knitting, where you set the carriage to knit in one direction and slip in the other (doesn’t matter which is which). The yarn that floats across the back of the 3 (or 4) cord stitches when the carriage slips actually gets absorbed into the other stitches as you pull down on the knitting, forming a perfectly round cord. The float disappears and because its length is absorbed by the other stitches, it is usually a good idea to knit I-cord with a slightly smaller stitch size than you might use for stockinette so that the cord stitches are not big and sloppy.

The I-Cord Bind Off is worked exactly the same way except that all of the garment edge stitches (or the picked up selvage edge) are also on the machine, but in holding position. By transferring the nearest stitch from holding position to the adjacent working needle, one stitch is bound off as you work two passes (1 actual row) of the I-cord.

The cord seems to join the fabric more neatly if it is worked with the right side of the fabric facing you. If the purl side is the right side, you don’t need to do anything. If, However, the knit side is supposed to be the right side, scrap off  or use a garter bar and re-hang with the knit side facing you.

You do need to keep moving the 3 (or 4) I-cord stitches over closer to the needles in hold and although most people do this with every transfer, I often do it every two transfers as shown in the tutorial because it is faster.

When working the cord around corners, you might want to make a decrease and then 4 passes of the carriage (2 actual rows) for the last repeat on one edge and the first on the next. This will ensure that the corner doesn’t flatten out.

All the edges – and the shoulder tucks – of this simple cardigan are finished with I-cords. The pattern is one of the free downloads available at www.guagliumi.com.

To work an I-cord edging all around – including the cast-on edge – begin and end on waste yarn so that you can rehang live stitches, rather than a cast-on or bound-off edge. It will be neater and if the yarn is very soft or stretchy, you may also want to double a couple of stitches as you re-hang them to keep the work from spreading sideways.

When picking up side (selvage) edges, try to always pick up either a full stitch (my preference) or a half stitch (if you prefer) throughout. Also, just pick up 3 of every 4 stitches along the edge to make sure you don’t stretch and elongate the edge.

There are three rows of I-cord edging along the bottom and the front edges (where I have also included buttonholes) of this cardigan. For more information about this sweater, check the free downloads at my web site.

In addition to working a single cord around the edge of a garment, you can work multiple rows of I-cord by picking up and re-hanging the previous I-cord on the needles as I did in the photo at left.

This cardigan is one of the garment patterns from More Hand-Manipulated Stitches. It features a double I-cord application all around and...
This cardigan is one of the garment patterns from More Hand-Manipulated Stitches. It features a double I-cord application all around and…

 

 

 

I-cord is also a great way to seam garments (or afghans!) if you re-hang the two garment pieces with their wrong sides together as I did in the beige cardigan at left. Just make sure that both sleeves are rehung the same way because there is a definite right and wrong side to the way the cord adjoins the garment. That is, if you re-hang the first side with the back shoulder first and the front on top of it, make sure the second shoulder is re-hung the same way.

 

 

...shoulder seams joined with I-cord and....
…shoulder seams joined with I-cord and….
Bridged slits for I-cord ties.
Bridged slits for I-cord ties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are detailed directions for working this bind-off in both More Hand-Manipulated Stitches and Hand Knits by Machine

Cloudborn Yarn – YUM!

Felted slippers in three sizes - easy and fun to knit!
Felted slippers in three sizes – easy and fun to knit!

Quite recently I designed a fun, easy pattern for felted slippers, based on a hand knit pattern that a Norwegian friend shared with me. Worked every-other-needle on a mid-gauge or bulky machine with Cloudborn Bulky Wool Twist, they felted perfectly – and I think they look fabulous.

The pattern includes 3 sizes – the smallest size is suitable for children and you can always felt a second or third time for more shrinkage. This pattern is available for purchase ($4.00) on either Craftsy.com or Revelry.com. Right now I am trying to find the time to finish up a sweet, striped baby sweater using Cloudborn Superwash Merino Sport and once that pattern is written and proofed four times, it will also be available on both Craftsy and Ravelry.

Cloud born has gorgeous alpaca and blends
Cloudborn has gorgeous alpaca and blends

I’m often a little skeptical of mail-ordering yarn, but the Cloudborn yarns are extremely high quality and I have loved the four different yarns that I have worked with so far. Besides, I like to shop in my PJ’s and then wait for UPS to show up with boxes!

My Craftsy affiliate link http://www.craftsy.com/ext/SusanGuagliumi_Cloudborn  will bring you right to the page with all of the Cloudborn yarns. And, by the way, no. None of them are available on cones, but who cares?! Invest in an inexpensive ball winder and enjoy working with some really gorgeous stuff.

Gorgeous colors and a wide range of yarn sizes and content.
Gorgeous colors and a wide range of yarn sizes and content.