Happy Thanksgiving!

Many of us here in the US have just put away all the dishes and the extra leaves for the dining room table now that Thanksgiving is behind us. I think I have had more than enough turkey to last me for a while! Thanksgiving is always a time for families – and ushers in the beginning of winter and the holiday season. I’m looking forward to less time in the garden, a lighter teaching load and more time here in the studio working on the book that will ultimately be titled something like: Hand-Manipulated Stitches: Eyelets, Ladders and Slits, (with a subtitle) Exploring Open Spaces.

I always have a tendency to get a little overly-absorbed in the projects at hand and I have found myself really enjoying the fabrics and techniques I am working on for this book. Right now I have taken a break from all the sampling and swatches to work on a gorgeous all-over 3-stitch eyelet pattern and once that sweater is done, I will post the pattern on the web site and let you know here on the blog.

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Giant 3-stitch eyelets swirl across this linen pullover. Godets at fullness and drape at the side seams.

In the meantime, I just posted the pattern for the Swirling Eyelets Sweater I did a year ago. The pattern first appeared in Machine Knitting Monthly Magazine, but some of you may not subscribe (shame!) so I decided it was time to make the pattern available on my web site. Just go to the page called “Free Stuff” and you will see it at the top of the list. The model is my lovely friend, Anne.

The pattern features huge 3-stitch eyelets and godets that add fullness and drape at the sides. The sleeves are knitted down after picking up the armhole edge. Open spaces are all the rage in ready-to-wear right now and this sweater is easy enough for a beginner.

linen-detailMy sweater was knitted with some gorgeous worsted weight linen that I bought from Silk City. It has fabulous weight and drape. However, the yarn may no longer be available and, if it is, it was tough to knit with. Linen has no give at all and even on the bulky machine it was heavy, arm-muscle -building work! The concept and design will work in any weight yarn on any machine so be good to yourself and pick a nice stretchy wool or blend. I hope you like it!

 

A Great Tip!

I’ve always felt that my students have as much to teach me as I do them! These two tips came in recently from blog subscribers who were happy to share them with you!

This first tip is from Patricia Lewis and I think it is an ingenious idea!

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Hi Susan,

As I was working on a scarf project today, it occured to me that I should share my method of keeping track of which stitches need to be transfered.  I use “Avery Removable Coding Labels”in the 1/4” size, which are just the perfect size of dots to stick on the LK 150 needlebed.  I place the dots just above or below the numbers on the number strip.
The color coded dots indicate to me which stitches need to be hand manipulated.  I also place a matching color coded dot on the pattern text to remind me of what that dot means!
In the photo attached, you will see several different colored dots, this is allowing me to switch between working on several different projects without losing time to figure out all of the charting all over again.
These little dots are a “God send” as they are so easy to stick on the machine, do not interfere with the carriage & are easy to remove with no residue left behind.  I can pick them up at Walmart here in Canada and I assume you can get them in the USA Walmart as well.
 Pat Lewis
The second tip is from Carol Olson and will make it even easier for you to work the K2P2 bind off I posted a while back. She knits two rows of ravel cord before scrapping off the work, but knits each one in a different color so she avoids any confusion of which stitches to work! Makes it easy to distinguish the knits from the purls in the rib. Wish I had thought of that!
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New Craftsy Class!!!!

11259_machine_knitting-hand-manipulated_stitches_susan_guagliumi29578_11227_11259So excited!

My third Craftsy class, Machine Knitting: Hand-Manipulated Stitches, has launched and I really hope you will all be as pleased with it as I am! Although the title of the class is similar to the title of my first book and the companion video, be assured that this is an entirely new class!

Use this link to bring you to the class on the Craftsy site and, when you check out, use this code (over on the right side) for 50% off: b93ebedf-370b-498d-9cf0-4.(Limit one per customer. Cannot be combined with any other offers). This code will expire in mid-January so check my web site for a new code after that date.

Once again, we used the LK-150 for this class because it is really the lowest common denominator for the greatest number of machines. There are just so many new knitters out there with no place to go for help that we have decided to focus on them. The experts and old hands are usually not quite as hungry for instruction, but I hope that even some of them find the material in this new class interesting and challenging!

The class is divided into six lessons that cover cables, short row intarsia, Bridging, re-hung stitches, traveling and twisted stitches and some open spaces (the topic of the book I am still working away on!). The class materials include all of the charts and instructions for the samples I work on screen and, once again, the camera work is incredible!

During the filming of the class, my producer decided to play “20 Questions” with me so that my students could begin to get to know me a bit. I hope you enjoy this clip!