Vittadini by Machine

I decided to return to the issue of converting hand knit patterns to the machine. It becomes more and more necessary with the lack of good sources for reliable machine knit patterns these days. I stress reliable because I am a firm believer in good editing and much of the material on the internet has never been edited. Even with editing, mistakes slip by and I know that when I find 2 + 2 = 5 the first time, I am likely to keep making the same mistake throughout! There is nothing as valuable as good technical editing to make sure a pattern is correct throughout.

That said, the patterns in magazines like Vogue Knitting and Knitter’s are often doable by machine – and dependably edited to eliminate as many mistakes as humanely possible.

Trisha Malcolm, editor of Vogue Knitting, gave permission for me to reproduce the pattern for this gorgeous Vittadini cardigan so I could detail the step by step directions for converting it to the machine. I realized, once I was done, that it is actually quite similar to the garment I talked about in a blog posting on 8/30/16 – another shawl collared sweater. Sorry about the duplication and next time I will focus on necklines and armholes a bit more. This post is actually far more detailed and, I hope, useful.

I have included both the original pattern and the converted version in a Vittadini Conversion PDF that you can download to work from. The important information for my size (medium – a girl can dream!) is highlighted in yellow. The red type explains the changes that need to be made for the machine.

Just a couple of notes:

(1) Numbers were not rounded off until I needed to know how many rows or stitches and then they were usually rounded up to even numbers.

(2) Each section on the schematic begins with RC 000. So, once the lower body of the garment is done, reset the RC000 before starting the armhole shaping, etc.

(3) These are some of the abbreviations I have used:

STS     stitch/stitches

NDLS  needle/needles

HP       holding position

C/O     cast on

B/O    bind off

S/O    scrap off (shown with a small triangle symbol on schematic).

 

Lastly, I tried my very best to keep going back over the text and re-checking the re-checked math so if you find something that doesn’t compute right about when you thought you understood what was happening – it is probably my mistake not yours!

We’re roasting here in Connecticut this week – hopefully the cooler fall weather is coming soon and we’ll all feel a bit more like knitting!

 

 

 

 

 

Marco Polo Hats Revisited!

In 1993, Studio by White published Simply Sensational, a collection of patterns for the LK-150. All of the educators contributed their ideas when it came time to write the pattern for the Marco Polo Hats. That summer, at Camp Tuckanitslip, we held a contest for the best hats and were delighted that so many of our customers took us up on the offer and entered the contest. I have just posted the pattern on the Free Stuff page of my web site. You can access that page by clicking on the link you were sent when you registered for my newsletter.

This hat is a great learning project for  beginning knitters because it utilizes so many techniques, but experienced knitters will have fun embellishing and altering the pattern to suit their personal style. It is never too early to start knitting for holiday gifting and hopefully this pattern will give some of you the confidence to try something new. I’d love to see photos of whatever you come up with!

The pattern offers two alternatives to the short rowed earflaps and you could, of course, eliminate the flaps altogether or add bodacious ruffles like the version worn by Tara, the little girl in the photo. (I should mention that Tara showed up as our model in almost every issue of Studio Design Magazine and later graced the covers of my hand knitting pattern books  Twelve Sweaters One Way: Cuff-to-Cuff and later Saddle Shoulders. As time marches on, she is now the mother of two beautiful little children herself!)

The brim can be smaller than our versions and you can embellish it or not. The ties can be replaced with wider, scarf-like pieces and the yarns you choose can be as wild and crazy or as subdued as you choose. Have fun and express your true inner self!