Great Work from Blog Subscribers!

fingerlessmittLast week I got an email from Maria Anna Youngs, who I met when I taught at a seminar in Minnesota this past summer. She took my entrelac class and was evidently  bitten by the entrelac bug because she has been knitting lots of pairs of these fingerless mitts for holiday gifting. She said she got the original idea from Eileen Montgomery and used my excellent entrelac directions for the execution. Wouldn’t these look great over a pair of plain mittens or gloves for extra warmth and pizzaz?!

fingerlessmitt2Maria Anna said that she worked with sock yarn on a standard gauge machine (stitch size 7) and that the base row for each mitt is 4 triangles wide, with 10 stitches in each triangle. Most were worked 7 sections high (including beginning and ending triangles), but she suggested working a couple more sections for a longer cuff. The mitts are seamed along the side, leaving an opening for the thumb. Most of them measured 6.5-7″ wide and 5.5-6″ long. What a great way to use up small amounts of beautiful yarns!

image2I also got an email from Lynn Jones with photos of the shawl collared sweater she did on her Brother 260 (bulky) with Premier Yarn’s “Puzzle”. She finished the front edges with an I-cord trim and also worked a modified drop shoulder to reduce armhole bulk. I think she did a gorgeous job!

 

 

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There are still a couple of openings in my classes at VKL in NYC next month (January already!) I’ll be doing one session with highlights from the book I am still working on about open spaces.

 

 

5k-students-badgeLast, but not least, I want to thank all of you who have enrolled in my Craftsy classes! The first class, which launched just a little over a year ago, now has over 5,000 students and the other two classes are doing really well. Thank you for your confidence in me and your continued support! Remember, there are always discount coupons available on my web site .

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Many of us here in the US have just put away all the dishes and the extra leaves for the dining room table now that Thanksgiving is behind us. I think I have had more than enough turkey to last me for a while! Thanksgiving is always a time for families – and ushers in the beginning of winter and the holiday season. I’m looking forward to less time in the garden, a lighter teaching load and more time here in the studio working on the book that will ultimately be titled something like: Hand-Manipulated Stitches: Eyelets, Ladders and Slits, (with a subtitle) Exploring Open Spaces.

I always have a tendency to get a little overly-absorbed in the projects at hand and I have found myself really enjoying the fabrics and techniques I am working on for this book. Right now I have taken a break from all the sampling and swatches to work on a gorgeous all-over 3-stitch eyelet pattern and once that sweater is done, I will post the pattern on the web site and let you know here on the blog.

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Giant 3-stitch eyelets swirl across this linen pullover. Godets at fullness and drape at the side seams.

In the meantime, I just posted the pattern for the Swirling Eyelets Sweater I did a year ago. The pattern first appeared in Machine Knitting Monthly Magazine, but some of you may not subscribe (shame!) so I decided it was time to make the pattern available on my web site. Just go to the page called “Free Stuff” and you will see it at the top of the list. The model is my lovely friend, Anne.

The pattern features huge 3-stitch eyelets and godets that add fullness and drape at the sides. The sleeves are knitted down after picking up the armhole edge. Open spaces are all the rage in ready-to-wear right now and this sweater is easy enough for a beginner.

linen-detailMy sweater was knitted with some gorgeous worsted weight linen that I bought from Silk City. It has fabulous weight and drape. However, the yarn may no longer be available and, if it is, it was tough to knit with. Linen has no give at all and even on the bulky machine it was heavy, arm-muscle -building work! The concept and design will work in any weight yarn on any machine so be good to yourself and pick a nice stretchy wool or blend. I hope you like it!

 

New Craftsy Class!!!!

11259_machine_knitting-hand-manipulated_stitches_susan_guagliumi29578_11227_11259So excited!

My third Craftsy class, Machine Knitting: Hand-Manipulated Stitches, has launched and I really hope you will all be as pleased with it as I am! Although the title of the class is similar to the title of my first book and the companion video, be assured that this is an entirely new class!

Use this link to bring you to the class on the Craftsy site and, when you check out, use this code (over on the right side) for 50% off: b93ebedf-370b-498d-9cf0-4.(Limit one per customer. Cannot be combined with any other offers). This code will expire in mid-January so check my web site for a new code after that date.

Once again, we used the LK-150 for this class because it is really the lowest common denominator for the greatest number of machines. There are just so many new knitters out there with no place to go for help that we have decided to focus on them. The experts and old hands are usually not quite as hungry for instruction, but I hope that even some of them find the material in this new class interesting and challenging!

The class is divided into six lessons that cover cables, short row intarsia, Bridging, re-hung stitches, traveling and twisted stitches and some open spaces (the topic of the book I am still working away on!). The class materials include all of the charts and instructions for the samples I work on screen and, once again, the camera work is incredible!

During the filming of the class, my producer decided to play “20 Questions” with me so that my students could begin to get to know me a bit. I hope you enjoy this clip!