Hand Sewn Bind Off for 2 x 2 Rib

A few weeks ago (5/16/16) I posted a blog about a hand sewn bind off for 1 x 1 ribbing and figured I would follow up with the 2 x 2 version while it is all fresh in my mind! Most of the 1 x 1 information is relevant to the 2 x 2 bind off as well so you might want to re-read the earlier blog before you try the 2 x 2 method.

Key to this bind off is a very specific way of scrapping off all the rib stitches. This bind off is suitable for ribs worked by latching up or with a ribber.

Transfer all the ribber stitches to the main bed. Set the carriage for slip. On my Silver Reed 860 I just switch the cam lever to Slip and put the side levers back so the carriage will slip all needles in working position. I set both of the Russel Levers on (II) so that they knit needles that are in holding position.

Bring all of the ribber stitches (the knit stitches as they face you) to holding position and knit 1 row with ravel cord. The needles in HP should have knitted and those in WP slipped. Now set the cam lever to stockinette and knit 1 row across all the needles. Change to waste yarn and knit about 10 rows and then drop the work from the machine.

Press the waste knitting (NOT the ribs) so it does not curl and then fold it back so the stitches present themselves in two neat and distinct rows. The stitches in each row will be paired with a two stitch gap between each pair – the gap is accounted for by the pairs of stitches in the opposite row.

The important thing to remember here is that each stitch is worked twice. You always insert the needle into a previously worked stitch and out through a new stitch, regardless of which row of stitches you are working on. So, in the old and out the new is the rule.

In addition, when working on the lower row of stitches (left in my video), the needle always enters up through an old stitch (left to right) and down through a new one (right to left).

When working the upper row of stitches (right in the video), the needle always enters down through the old stitch and up through the new one. In the video the needles enters the old stitch from right to left and up through the new stitch from left to right.

The yarn passes over the edge as you alternate from side to side and sometimes the two stitches are immediately adjacent to each other; other times they are further apart. In either case, only tug the yarn enough to prevent any loose loops, but not so tightly that it binds the edge and prevents it from stretching.

As with the 1 x 1 bind off, this edge almost exactly matches the circular cast on edge and is a goods place to thread through some elastic to remind cotton or linen edges where to return to. The elastic won’t correct a bad rib, but it will act as a memory for a good one so that it always contracts nicely.

I always shape my necklines with short rows and retain as many live stitches as I possibly can. Then I join one shoulder seam, rehang the entire neck edge and knit my ribs. I end with the ravel cord and waste knitting I described earlier and then I drop the work from the machine. I usually join the second shoulder before I work the hand sewn bind off because I can work the bind off continuously across the seam to disguise its beginning or end.

These hand sewn bind offs are well worth the effort because they look better and they stretch and return to shape better than any other method I have tried.

 

Author: Susan Guagliumi

I'm a machine knitter, author, gardener and pretty good cook. I live in Connecticut with my husband, Arthur.

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