Another Free Pattern

Modeled by Carol Scott, this top is one-size fits most. Both the knit and the purl side of the fabric are interesting – its your choice which to use for the right side.

I’m still plugging away on book #4 (Hand-Manipulated Stitches, Exploring Open Spaces) and although there are no sweater patterns in the book itself, I just posted the third free pattern (based on the techniques in the book) on the web site.

The first pattern was called “Swirling Eyelets” and the second “3D Eyelets and Nops”. Both of those were inspired by the first section of the book, which deals with extreme eyelets.

The third Open Space pattern is called “Slit Topper” and is indicative of the kinds of things I am including in the section on Slits. Eventually I will get some Ladder inspired sweaters done as well.

Frankly, I’m having a lot of fun playing with the “what if” and “I wonder if I could…” approach to some of these experiments in open fabrics, but I am getting restless to start making some sweaters. Hopefully the fall will afford me a bit more time. I think I say that every season, but the end is in sight and eventually I will have the time to do some garment knitting. I hope!

As often as I can, I weave in ends as I work, but for this garment, I should have waited until it was done and worked them in by hand. It turned out I like the purl side of the fabric even more than I do the knit side. The woven-in ends showed just enough to negate the possibility of using the purl side as right side and they were clipped too close to start re-working them in. Live and learn. I did include some photos of the purl side of the fabric in the pattern so you can see the difference. I think that the way the fabric curls towards the purl side adds an interesting bit of texture to the overall fabric. My advice would be to wait on the ends until you decide which side you like best for the right side.

In the meantime, enjoy this new pattern! You can access all the free downloads by signing up for the newsletter on my web site. Just save the confirmation email with the link that will bring you directly to the list of free downloads – you cannot directly access that page from anywhere on the web site.

More Free Downloads!

Tucks and Twists is one of my all-time favorite sweaters.

I’m really happy to tell you that Knitter’s Magazine just gave me permission to share all of the patterns I did for them back in the 90’s. I have been busy scanning and have finally got them all added to the free downloads on my web site.

I think that most of the patterns have stood the test of time quite well. Just be aware that the yarns will most likely no longer be available and you will have to do some substituting. There is a wide variety of techniques to be learned from these patterns and many of them were done for the LK150. As always, you need to be registered for the web site newsletter to enjoy all the freebies. Also, feel free to share these patterns with your knit clubs and friends, but please make sure my name and the credit to Knitter’s Magazine remains on any copies.

“Back in the day” when I was with Studio, we used to advertise in Knitter’s (and other hand knit magazines) so they were much more open to featuring machine knit patterns than they might be today.

These are the patterns I just posted:

24 Gold Carrots – a multi-color tuck stitch pullover with 24 appliqué’s gold carrots that was the inspiration for the issue called Fakes and Funnies.

Basket of Flowers

Basket of Flowers – a really gorgeous hand-manipulated stitch that uses woven stitches to create an undulating fabric.

Little Girl Blue – a child’s cardigan with smocking.

Mozambique Mosaic – a fabulous LK150 two-color tuck stitch (AKA Tuck Mosaic) worked on the LK150. There is also a Tips & Techniques download on mosaic stitch and, of course, a whole chapter in Hand Knits by Machine.

Peacock Tails – is a light weight, open mohair cardigan that uses a unique hand transfer method that, in fact, I am revisiting in the ladder chapter of the current book project. This is a great technique to stretch your yarn further because the fabric is more air than stitches!

Sideways Vest – I designed it as a women’s vest, but they wanted more men’s patterns for the magazine and decided that this one qualified as uni-sex. This one features sideways construction and a neat little added detail at the beck.

Tucks and Twists – This was one of my favorite sweaters ever. It is a lush combination of tuck stitch, twisted stitches and the Judith Duffy cabled edging.

Royal Hawaiian – this one uses a narrow short rowed zig-zag band for the edging.

I also uploaded the pattern for an intarsia vest, “Como se Llama?” that I did for Knit ‘N Style Magazine, which has been out of publication for years.The entire vest is worked in intarsia and the charts are all included.

Lastly, Gini Woodward sent me the original directions that used to come with the garter bars (or, rather the “garter stitch accessory” as they called it back then). I have added that with the Tips & Techniques.

Exciting News!

Its a wrap!
Its a wrap!

I’ve been leaking hints for the last few weeks, but it is official: Machine Knitting Special Techniques: Color and Texture will be released by the end of May on Craftsy.com.

This is my second class for Craftsy and I have to say that I have loved working with them. The preparation that goes into a Craftsy class is amazing – with highly qualified people assigned to every step along the way. I feel very fortunate to have these opportunities come my way!

How is THIS for close-up detail?!
How is THIS for close-up detail?!

This class is divided into three sections. First, we take a look at the garter bar. To say that the close ups are amazing is an understatement! I think you will agree, once you see it, that it brings each step clearly into focus and makes the process of turning work over (for one) a whole lot more understandable.

Peruvian Dancer Intarsia Sweater pattern (in four sizes) is included in the lass materials.
Peruvian Dancer Intarsia Sweater pattern (in four sizes) is included in the lass materials.

The next section focuses on intarsia knitting and the last section on entrelac knitting. The projects included in the class materials include a cap with a shaped crown, an intarsia sweater with an unusual edging and an intarsia tunic.

I chose the Peruvian dancer motif for the intarsia sweater because I have always loved Peruvian textiles. In fact, the charts I included for practice pieces are also Peruvian inspired – a cat and a jaguar – that you could use on any garment.

I worked the intarsia designs with Lion Brand Superwash Merino, which is a DK weight that knits beautifully on mid-gauge and chunky machines. For the entrelac tunic, I used Lion Fisherman wool. All of my samples were worked on the LK150, but these are methods suitable for all machines. Garter bar, intarsia and entrelac are all methods that do not rely on fancy machines and are worked the same on all brands and gauges.

The class is due to launch at the end of May – I’ll let you know when I have an exact date. I plan to give away FIVE FREE CLASSES to subscribers of this blog so if you have been linking over from Facebook or Twitter, make sure you are subscribed to the blog itself so your name is included in the drawing.

The Farmyard series features wrap-around motifs. I love the ducks!
The Farmyard series features wrap-around motifs. I love the ducks!

Free Intarsia Patterns for Children!!! Because I have had intarsia on my mind a lot lately, I contacted Vogue Knitting and was able to get permission to offer the children’s patterns I did for Family Circle Easy Knitting Magazine as free downloads on my web site. Just go to the “Free Stuff” page and look for Farmyard or Reptile Sweaters. You should blow up the charts when you print them out – magazines always try to save space and these were long patterns with lots of visuals. The charts are small.

 

The beginner class met in mid-april - a great group that hit it off right away - with each other and with me!
The beginner class met in mid-april – a great group that hit it off right away – with each other and with me!

Still time to enroll in a class here in Connecticut! 

The two classes I offered here in Connecticut are over or full, but the local Recreation Department, which is sponsoring the classes, has added another 2-day class on Saturday/Sunday, May 21 & 22. The cost is $150 and includes lunch both days – and dinner at my house on Saturday night. To register, contact the North Branford Rec Dept at 203-484-6017.

Happy Mother’s Day and Happy Spring!