Decorative Tulip Edging

This tulip edging is one of my favorite trims and it offers beginners a whole wealth of new techniques.

You’ll need to cast on a multiple of 7 stitches, plus 2 for the final edge. I usually use a simple crochet/latch tool cast on to begin, followed by 3 rows.

This chart shows the extra 2 stitches used to balance the design; those stitches only appear with the very last repeat.

Next you’ll need to reduce each group of 7 stitches down to 5 stitches by transferring the 1st and 5th stitch in each group onto their adjacent needles. There will be 2 plain stitches between each reduced group. This leaves you with empty needles spaced across the width of the knitting. Although you could scrap off and re-hang, you’ll find that it is a lot faster to remove all of the stitches on a garter bar and then replace them on the needles, shifting the GB to the left after each group of stitches is returned to the needles. If you count the empty needles after making the transfers, you will know how may needles to eliminate; push half of the extra needles back to NWP at each edge to remain centered on the bed.

After knitting 3 more rows, you need to reduce the groups of 3 stitches down to a single stitch. Make the transfers then remove the work on the GB and eliminate the extra needles at each side before replacing the stitches on the needles, shifting the garter bar as needed to fill in.

The two plain stitches that divide each repeat should be latched up in order the help the tulips stand out from the background. I usually do this after all the decreases and GB work are done and before I work the row of chaining on the front of the fabric.

I use a single row of chaining in front of the fabric to sort of cap off the trimming, but you might choose not to do this – especially is you are going to continue the rib effect through the entire fabric either by manually reforming stitches or using a ribber.

This trim reduces down quickly; each group of 7 stitches reduces down to just 3 stitches. So, for example, if you cast on 149 stitches (21 repeats of 7 plus 2 to balance the edge), that will reduce down to a mere 65 stitches. This is the widest piece of trim you will be able to knit on a mid-gauge (150 needle bed) machine. 198 stitches on a standard gauge machine (20o needle bed) will reduce down to 86 stitches and on a bulky machine the maximum width trim will reduce from 107 to 47 stitches.

Because the final number of trim stitches will be used as the beginning edge of your garment, unless you are knitting baby clothes, you will need to piece this trim for larger sizes. One edge stitch on each piece will be taken into the seam and will be invisible if you use mattress stitch to join the pieces.

2 thoughts on “Decorative Tulip Edging”

  1. Dear Susan, I have turned up the volume on my computer all the way, but I have problems hearing your instructions. Could you turn up the volume on your recording? Thank you.

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